The Bryn Celli Ddu Rock Art Project

The Bryn Celli Ddu Rock Art Project

This community archaeology project, based on Anglesey, will centre on the Bryn Celli Ddu landscape — with a particular focus on a rock art outcrop located in a nearby field that has not been excavated scientifically. The site comprises a substantial natural outcrop, lying west of Bryn Celli Ddu tomb. The outcrop has several recently … Continue reading

Making Monuments: Druidic Circles

Making Monuments: Druidic Circles

Recent Stone Circles The recent construction of megalithic monuments, in particular stone circles, within Britain can be traced back to the development of the modern Druidic movement. The antiquarian John Aubrey, who suggested in 1659 that the stone circles at Avebury and Stonehenge had been built by the Celts as druidic temples. The Irish author, J. … Continue reading

24th Century BC Party People

24th Century BC Party People

So what makes a modern British festival? People, music, food, drink, dance and socialising.  Folk are drawn to the event from outside the local areas, they travel with their own temporary homes and set up cheek by jowl with strangers. Festivals are about meeting with different social groups, ‘feasting’ on unusual foods and drinks, taking … Continue reading

The Mind in the Cave

The Mind in the Cave

We kicked off our spring season at the Barbican and Wellcome Wonder Street Fair at the  British Festival of Neuroscience London (7th – 10th April) with ‘The Mind in the Cave’. This is a dynamic, hands on (but eyes off) activity – conceived by the artist Paul Evans – that allows participants of all ages to engage with the … Continue reading

Time Team and Shamanic Street Preachers

Time Team and Shamanic Street Preachers

This week GA went out with TimeTeam to film their  special program on the Mesolithic. Part of their focus is on Star Carr, an early Mesolithic site, and the famous antler head dresses found at the site in the 50’s and now held in various museums.  Our role was to help explore what these head dresses, … Continue reading

Shamanic Street Preachers meet the Green Man

Shamanic Street Preachers meet the Green Man

Last weekend Guerrilla Archaeology braved the rain and mud (oh the mud) to bring our tent to the Green Man Festival, set in the gorgeous Glanusk Park in the shadow of Crug Hwyel Iron Age hillfort. This was our second visit to the festival, and this time we brought the shamanic theme that had been … Continue reading

Wild thing – you make my heart sing

Wild thing – you make my heart sing

Guerilla Archaeology had a grand old time at Wilderness giving formal talks and informal classroom sessions.  Many people answered the call to the wild and explored their shamanic side, left hand prints and checked out the effect of geology and climate on their internal chemistry.  See all the images here on Flickr. We are busy re-packing our Shamanic … Continue reading

Ochre Mining – Deep Reds

Ochre Mining – Deep Reds

GA went on a day trip to the only working British ochre mines – Clearwell Caves were one of the first producers of ochres,  in the late Neolithic to early Bronze-age and are now one of the last. Well worth a visit, particularly to purchase their range of ochre colours – yellow, orange, brown, red and purple and … Continue reading

Shamans out on the airwaves.

Shamans out on the airwaves.

Listen to this interview with Dr Henry Droselda – our shaman recorded at Secret Garden Party.  Henry describes his five years living in Papua New Guinea, discusses the role that animals play in Shamanism, and his encounter with a grouse that later ended up on his Shaman Tree. There is a later interview with Dr David Luke … Continue reading

Guerrilla Archaeology does Day of Archaeology

Guerrilla Archaeology does Day of Archaeology

My Day of Archaeology post will feature one project in particular: my involvement in a new creative engagement project which sees a group of like-minded Cardiff based archaeologists, artists and scientists bring the past alive at festivals! This is quite a new thing for archaeologists in Wales, and perhaps the UK, and I believe there’s … Continue reading

Bronze Age shamanism?

Bronze Age shamanism?

This week, I’ll be moving forward into the Bronze Age, which dates to around 4000 years ago in Britain. Specifically, I’ll be exploring  the possible shaman’s grave at Upton Lovell round barrow in Wiltshire. Here, there is evidence for a very elaborate burial, with several objects suggesting that it was perhaps a grave of a … Continue reading

Neolithic Shamanism?

Neolithic Shamanism?

I’ve been studying the Neolithic period now for more than 8 years, and I really do think that we can observe shamanic attributes in their way of life, from monument building to daily life. In this post I will explore the Neolithic site of Knowth in Ireland. The aim is to show you how shamanism can … Continue reading

Mesolithic Shamanism?

Mesolithic Shamanism?

Star Carr is a seasonal Mesolithic site situated in the Vale of Pickering, North Yorkshire, England. Early Mesolithic activities dating back about 10,700 years can be found here. The site was originally excavated during the early 50s, with excavations led by Manchester and York Universities continuing to today. In this post I will explore the evidence found … Continue reading

Paleolithic Shamanism?

Paleolithic Shamanism?

Goat’s Hole cave, Paviland, on the Gower Peninsula in South Wales, is the name of the now famous burial of the ‘Red Lady’, who actually turned out to be a man! It is one of the best-known prehistoric burials in Britain – discovered back in 1823.  Goat’s Hole Cave, the final resting place of the … Continue reading

Antiquities Liberation Army

Antiquities Liberation Army

Short story entitled Guerilla Archaeology ‘I looked down from the police helicopter at the gridlocked streets. We landed near the cause of the chaos, and I walked to the hole in the road I knew we were on the site of a first century Roman villa. The neatly excavated trench that spanned the full width of … Continue reading

Guerilla Archaeology: Singapore

‘Archaeologists have an important role in extending mankind’s memory beyond its natural capacity, limited by personal memories, and therefore enabling us access to a wider perspective of the past’ GAs are around the world.  See the talk by Prof Miksic, titled Guerrilla Archaeologists and the Singapore Story.   Miksic believes that, like many guerrilla units who … Continue reading

Get ahead – Shaman style

Get ahead – Shaman style

This week we took delivery of seven deer skulls we will be using to recreate the Star Carr head-dresses. The originals are twenty-one adult red deer skull with antlers altered to be worn as head-dresses.  They all date to the Early Mesolithic, about 9,500 years old, and were discovered at the site in the Vale of Pickering, North … Continue reading

A Day of Deer

The skulls of seven deer arrived today, ready for us to work into antler head dresses.  They are all relatively young males, teenagers of the deer world.   Their skulls and antlers are extremely beautiful – deer bones are some of the most attractive, being extremely gracile compare to most other terrestrial mammals.   We … Continue reading

Becoming Shaman

Becoming Shaman

In 2011 we went to Green Man music festival with Back to the Future  in 2012 we are holding a series of Shamanic themed events. Ritual formed a central part of the earliest British societies and Shamans were part of these ceremonies.  Guerrilla Archaeology offers participants the chance to explore the earliest evidence for native British Shamanic … Continue reading

Back to the Future@Green Man

Back to the Future@Green Man

Guerilla Archaeology were out and about at the Green Man music festival.   Our vibrant programme included workshops, installations and performances that blended science and nature with entertainment, art, craft and design and was held in the Festival’s ‘Einstein’s Garden’ area. Back to The Future focused on three main interactive themes: Future Animals, an art-based workshop … Continue reading

The ‘Guerilla Archaeology Glastonbury Experience’ from a student perspective;  Or, my free holiday making rings

The ‘Guerilla Archaeology Glastonbury Experience’ from a student perspective; Or, my free holiday making rings

Getting a Glastonbury ticket was a stressful experience which involved three hours of meticulously coordinated group effort and webpage refreshing. Despite this, the relief of procuring one of these sought-after tickets was great. Skip forward several months and it turns out that Guerrilla Archaeology, too, were attending Glastonbury and needed people to help out. So … Continue reading

Lunaticks, Sunworshippers and the Green Man

Lunaticks, Sunworshippers and the Green Man

Going Green Between 15th – 18th August, Guerilla Archaeology returned to the Einstein’s Garden area of the Green Man Festival at Glanusk Park near Crickhowell.  Our theme this year was Lunaticks and Sunworshippers, exploring the relationship between prehistoric life and astronomy. Over a warm weekend in the shadow of the Crickhowell hillfort, we showed off Bronze Age bling … Continue reading

The dark side of sun worship – Nazi Sun Worship

On the evening of 22 June 1935 Joseph Goebbels, the Nazi Propaganda Minister, gave a speech at a summer solstice festival held to open the Thingstätte on Heidelberg’s Holy Mountain. The Thingstätte, (a word with no English translation), was an open air amphitheatre, with banks of stone seats arranged around a central stage with flanking towers, … Continue reading