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Making Antler Rings

Making Antler Rings

We had the most fantastic time at Glastonbury with our small and handpicked team.  We were lucky enough to be adopted by GreenCrafts, run by Nic and Marie Piper, and got the chance to showcase some of the craft skills we have been learning. What started as a bit of a mad idea – that … Continue reading

Ochre Mining – Deep Reds

Ochre Mining – Deep Reds

GA went on a day trip to the only working British ochre mines – Clearwell Caves were one of the first producers of ochres,  in the late Neolithic to early Bronze-age and are now one of the last. Well worth a visit, particularly to purchase their range of ochre colours – yellow, orange, brown, red and purple and … Continue reading

Bronze Age shamanism?

Bronze Age shamanism?

This week, I’ll be moving forward into the Bronze Age, which dates to around 4000 years ago in Britain. Specifically, I’ll be exploring  the possible shaman’s grave at Upton Lovell round barrow in Wiltshire. Here, there is evidence for a very elaborate burial, with several objects suggesting that it was perhaps a grave of a … Continue reading

Neolithic Shamanism?

Neolithic Shamanism?

I’ve been studying the Neolithic period now for more than 8 years, and I really do think that we can observe shamanic attributes in their way of life, from monument building to daily life. In this post I will explore the Neolithic site of Knowth in Ireland. The aim is to show you how shamanism can … Continue reading

Mesolithic Shamanism?

Mesolithic Shamanism?

Star Carr is a seasonal Mesolithic site situated in the Vale of Pickering, North Yorkshire, England. Early Mesolithic activities dating back about 10,700 years can be found here. The site was originally excavated during the early 50s, with excavations led by Manchester and York Universities continuing to today. In this post I will explore the evidence found … Continue reading

Paleolithic Shamanism?

Paleolithic Shamanism?

Goat’s Hole cave, Paviland, on the Gower Peninsula in South Wales, is the name of the now famous burial of the ‘Red Lady’, who actually turned out to be a man! It is one of the best-known prehistoric burials in Britain – discovered back in 1823.  Goat’s Hole Cave, the final resting place of the … Continue reading